Goat Head Psycho Chenille

~By: Lance Dean | March 15, 2015

Goat Head Psycho Chenille


To start this review, I think its only right for me to state that I was not asked by Goat Head to do this review and that the Psycho Chenille used for this review I bought.

hile visiting the Wasatch Fly Tying Expo last year, I stopped by the Goat Head vendor booth to glance at what they were offering. They offered their share of sole spikes, but that is not what caught my attention.  From the corner of my eye, I caught this two foot spinning carousel that had something glimmering that hung from its hooks.  As I dove in for a closer look, I realized that what caught my attention had nothing to do with wading boots, but had a lot to do with fly tying and seeing how I am fly tying nut I went in for an even closer look. Well maybe I went straight to picking a bag from the carousel rather than going for a closer look.  To my amazement I discovered that there was some sort of Polar Chenille buried in the package. Beside the Goat Head logo the label read “Psycho Chenille”, “Electric Green” and “2 yards”. This particular package had a beautiful string of polar type chenille.  It shimmered in the light and grabbed my attention like a Copper John grabs a trout’s attention.  Like that trout, I couldn’t resist. I had to buy a package.  After everything was said and done I bought a bag of Electric Green, Big Sky Blue and Gold/Black. Because I purchased from the Expo I got it for cheaper than Goat Head has it up on their site. The Goat Head site is currently selling this item for $3.95.

Everywhere I have looked the cost of a package of Polar or Palmer Chenille is between $2.85 and $3.79. Granted the $3.79 was a sale price and was regularly priced at 4.99 a package.  If both packages had the same length of chenille, the Goat Head Psycho Chenille would be right in line with other chenille of the same type.  After measuring the lengths of chenille that come in a package of Goat Head Psycho Chenille, Wapsi Palmer Chenille and Hareline Polar Chenille, I can tell you that Pyscho Chenille comes with six feet of chenille in a package and both Wapsi Palmer Chenille and Hareline Polar Chenille come with twelve feet of chenille.  At $3.95 a pop this makes the cost of Psycho Chenille roughly .49 per foot compared to .32 for the Wapsi or Hairline versions bought at the same price. Will the price make me quit buying Psycho Chenille, probably not, because I really like Psycho Chenille and I will like it even more if they come out with a couple of UV colors.

Currently Psycho Chenille is offered in six different colors or color combos.

  • Big Sky Blue
  • Electric Green
  • Gold/Black
  • Gold/Tan
  • Red Rum
  • Silver/White
Goat Head Psycho Chenille Wrapped Around a Hook
Goat Head Psycho Chenille Wrapped Around a Hook
Most of the other chenille of the same type have many more colors to choose from, but from what I have
seen, Goat Head’s Psycho Chenille coloring is far bolder than other similar chenille. The fact that Psycho Chenille is only offered in limited colors is not a big deal, the six they have are about the only colors I buy anyway with the exception of a Fl. Orange and Fl. Chartreuse. I not only use Fl. Orange and Fl. Chartreuse regularly in my regular fly tying, but if fish see UV like many people believe then they probably ought to offer at least a couple colors in the UV spectrum. 

In my opinion Psycho Chenille reflects light better than similar Wapsi and Hairline chenille. I say this from me just playing with strands of Wapsi Palmer Chenille, Hareline Polar Chenille, and Goat Head Psycho Chenille in the light. In my opinion the Psycho Chenille just shimmers more in the light than the other two.

One big thing I noticed about Psycho Chenille is the cord that is the back bone of the chenille.  This is the main cord that you use to wrap the chenille around the hook.  I noticed that the Psycho Chenille had a heavier duty cord than the Wapsi Palmer Chenille or the Hareline Polar chenille.  It not only looked heavier duty but it felt heavier duty.  In my opinion, the Psycho Chenille is a more durable material than the Wapsi or Hareline.  I say this by only looking; I have not actually tested this observation so I can’t say for sure, but Psycho Chenille looks and feels stronger that Wapsi or Hareline.

With that being said…here are the Pro and Cons of Goat Head Psycho Chenille.

PROS:
  • Bold colors
  • Shimmers exceptionally well
  • Looks more durable than other chenille of the same type

CONS:
  • Cost, you can get double the amount of Wapsi or Hareline for right around the same amount you pay for Psycho Chenille.
  • Not offered in any UV colors

The point is I like Goat Head’s Psycho Chenille. The shimmer it gives is far superior to other chenille of the same type.  The bold colors that are offered keep me wanting to use it one streamer after another. Do I wish it came in a couple of UV Colors? Yes. Do I think that it should come in packages of four yards rather than two? Yes. But, overall this is an excellent fly tying material that belongs in every fly tyers’ inventory.

Here is a video review of Goat Head’s Psycho Chenille:



To purchase Goat Head Psycho Chenille go here.

To view a tutorial of the Provo Hooker where I use Goat Head Psycho Chenille go:  Provo Hooker

UPDATE:

I just received an email from Matthew Brown of Goat Head Sole Spikes and he responded to the email I sent to him regarding this review.  He says, "Thanks for the review! I'll have to add more product to the package. Stop by our Wasatch expo booth next week!"

Thanks for the response Matthew and I will be sure to stop by the Goat Head booth next Saturday.

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